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Wednesday, July 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of relative clause in English and other Germanic languages found in the catalog.

relative clause in English and other Germanic languages

John Helgander

relative clause in English and other Germanic languages

a historical and analytical survey.

by John Helgander

  • 353 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by University of Gothenburg, Dept. of English in [Gothenburg, Sweden] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • English language -- Pronoun.,
  • English language -- Relative clauses.,
  • Germanic languages -- Pronoun.,
  • Germanic languages -- Relative clauses.

  • Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPE1261 .H38
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvii, 307 p.
    Number of Pages307
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5460556M
    LC Control Number73163073

      subject relativizer in relative and free relative clauses (Vikner, ; Mikkelsen, ). Butthe wh -clauses in(2b) and (2c) are not relative clauses. Theyare i ndeed clauses and not NPs with a nominal wh -head and a relative clause as we show in the following. 5 Embedded wh -clauses occur in S-positions and not NP-positions and like Second, both passive and active relative clauses are relatively common in English, and their production frequency has been shown to vary as a function of head-noun animacy (Gennari & MacDonald, ; Roland, Dick, & Elman, ), thus resulting in an environment in which we can observe both kinds of choices and investigate the factors that, together with animacy, motivate ://

      Designed for an "Introduction to Germanic Languages" course, it will also be a welcome supplement for courses in the history of English, German, and the other Germanic languages [A] book that instructors would be wise to bring to the attention of students, since it will contribute clarity as well as understanding of important matters in ?id=   Tony McEnery and Andrew Hardie [I]f a zero relative pronoun is used, it may be possible for the first word of the relative clause to be interpreted as part of the main clause; Temperley [] gives the example phrase the biological toll logging can take, where the first four words are ambiguous on an initial reading--logging may be the head noun of the NP or the subject of the upcoming

      "The relative word in the nominal relative clause has no antecedent since the antecedent is fused with the relative: I found what (that which; the thing that) you were looking for; He says whatever (anything that) he e they are free of antecedents, such clauses are sometimes called independent or free relative clauses." (Tom McArthur, Concise Oxford Companion to the English The contributions in part I are concerned with central theoretical questions; part II consists of corpus-based cross-linguistic studies of clause combining and discourse structure, involving at least two of the languages English, German, Dutch, French and Norwegian; part III contains papers addressing specific – predominantly semantic


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Relative clause in English and other Germanic languages by John Helgander Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. The relative clause in English and other Germanic languages; a historical and analytical survey. [John Helgander]   The relative and cleft constructions of the Germanic and Romance languages.

Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Foris. E-mail Citation» A rich source of data containing a systematically organized overview of relative clauses in the Germanic and Romance (standard) languages. The first half of the book contains an elaborate discussion of theoretical Preposition Stranding and Relative Complementizer Deletion: Implicational Tendencies in English and the Other Germanic Languages.

In Adamson, Sylvia, Law, Vivien, Vincent, Nigel and Wright, Susan, eds., Papers from the 5th International Conference on English Historical Linguistics. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 87–   the relative clause. (1) Direct object When the relative pronoun is the direct object of the relative clause, it often refers to somebody or something.

English relative pronouns which, that, who(m) can act as both the introducer and the direct object in the relative clause. Correspondingly, German uses the accusative relative pronouns A relative clause is a subordinate clause that modifies a noun phrase, most commonly a example, the phrase "the man who wasn't there" contains the noun man, which is modified by the relative clause who wasn't there.A relative clause can also modify a pronoun, as in "he to whom I have written", or a noun phrase which already contains a modifier, as in "the black panther in the tree clause/en-en.

Particle verbs are a characteristic feature of the Germanic languages (e.g., HarbertHolmberg and Rijkhoff 85), but they are also known in other languages or language families   Anaphoric Elements in Relative Clauses "Relative clauses are so called because they are related by their form to an contain within their structure an anaphoric element whose interpretation is determined by the antecedent.

This anaphoric element may be overt or covert. In the overt case the relative clause is marked by the presence of one of the relative words who, whom, Request PDF | OnJackie Nordström and others published Complementizer semantics in the Germanic languages | Find, read and cite all the research you need on ResearchGate The present article is a summary of the book English: The Language of the Vikings by Joseph E.

Emonds and Jan Terje Faarlund. The major claim of the book and of this article is that there are lexical and, above all, syntactic arguments in favor of considering Middle and Modern English as descending from the North Germanic language spoken by the Scandinavian population in the East and North of ?language=en.

In their recent book, English: The Language of the Vikings, Joseph Embley Emonds and Jan Terje Faarlund attempt to make the case that from its Middle period onwards, English is a North Germanic language, descended from the Norse varieties spoken in Medieval England, rather than a West Germanic language, as traditionally this review article we critique Emonds & Faarlund's proposal PRs (1) are finite embedded clause, available in Italian among other languages, which look superficially like RCs (2) but are naturally translated as English gerundive constructions (as “In other languages, relative clauses may be marked in different ways: they may be introduced by a special class of conjunctions called relativizers; the main verb of the relative clause may appear in a special morphological variant; or a relative clause may be indicated by word order  › Homepage › Catalog › English Language and Literature Studies › Linguistics.

This movement operation is absent in English and other Germanic lan- guages due to the absence of strong F features. Kayne's () relative clause analysis allows us a way to make sense of the fact that deictic demonstratives may never introduce restrictive relative clauses, although indefinite specific demonstratives may do :// The cross-linguistic differences documented in studies of relative clause attachment offer an invaluable opportunity to examine a particular aspect of bilingual sentence processing: Do bilinguals process their two languages as if they were monolingual speakers of each.

The Germanic languages include two notable dialect continua – the West Germanic dialect continuum, encompassing Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland and Austria, and the Scandinavian dialect continuum, encompassing Denmark, Sweden, Norway and parts of Finland – in which it is impossible to draw non-arbitrary language boundaries   As regards relative clauses, English has two particularities that are unique among the Germanic languages: #In other Germanic languages, if a relative pronoun is the object of a preposition in the relative clause, then the preposition always appears at the start of the clause, before the relative Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers, Technology and Science Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs Non-English Audio Spirituality & Religion Librivox Free Audiobook JackieB Stadt der Fremden @海马电台 NMC Horizon Report > Australia-New Zealand Edition Beta Human Energy Insights Podcast Science & Vie «A voix haute» subordinate clause: the relative clause is a modifier, w hile the adnominal complement clause is a possessive attribute of the head.

The latter (possibl y a Spanish calque) can be seen in :// The Closest Languages to English: German. German is also closely related to English. English is, after all, a Germanic language. German is spoken primarily in Germany, but it’s also officially recognized in other localities around the world, even places as far-flung as Germanic - one of the largest sub-groups of the Indo-European language family - comprises 37 languages with an estimated million speakers worldwide.

This book presents a comparative linguistic survey of the full range of Germanic languages, both ancient and modern, including major world languages such as English and German (West Germanic), the Scandinavian (North Germanic) languages ?id=npySdp6EI30C.

Laurel Brinton’s The Comment Clause in English is, as the cover notes tell us, “the first full-length diachronic treatment [ ] focusing on comment clauses formed with common verbs of perception and cognition in a variety of syntactic forms”. The book runs to some pages, comprising eleven evenly balanced chapters, an extremely complete seventeen-page bibliography and a helpful Germanic languages is shown, including English, German, Frisian, and Dutch, but also Yiddish, Faroese, and Icelandic (i.e.

the Insular Scandinavian la nguages); C ontinental Scandinavian and '_Comparative. German grammar is the set of structural rules of the German language, which in many respects is quite similar to that of the other Germanic languages. Although some features of German grammar, such as the formation of some of the verb forms, resemble those of English, German grammar differs from that of English in that it has, among other things, cases and gender in nouns and a strict